Work on Robin Hood’s Bay sea wall underway

 

Friday, 11 September 2020

Work is taking place to the sea wall in Robin Hood’s Bay until the end of next week (18 September).

A specialist contractor is dealing with sections affected by ‘spalling’, where water gets into the concrete and gives the impression that it is flaking and peeling away.

At the same time, the structure is being tested for any other underlying defects.

The current sea wall is nearing the end of its design life. 

It was built in the 1970s and has been vital in protecting the village from the power of the sea and the aggressive coastal climate.

We are already working on longer-term plans to provide improved protection for another 100 years which would see the risk of damage to almost 200 properties being minimised.

£860,000 in funding has been made available for the improvement works.

The Environment Agency, the Yorkshire Regional Flood and Coastal Committee Local Levy, Fylingdales Parish Council and Scarborough Borough Council have all contributed to the cost.

Robin Hood’s Bay has a history of coastal erosion and landslides because of exposure to wave action which impacts almost directly on to the front of the village.

Cllr Michelle Donohue-Moncrieff, Cabinet Member for Environment and Sustainability, said:

"These works to the concrete sea wall in Robin Hood’s Bay are vital if we are to continue to protect the village and its residents.

"The tests will also help us understand what further work is required in the future.

"I am delighted that funds totalling £860,000 are being made available for substantial improvements.

"The support of our partner organisations to make this possible is much appreciated."

David Jeffels, joint chairman of the York and North Yorkshire Flood Risk Partnership, said:

"This scheme is crucial for the safety of the scores of homes perched on the cliff top, and for the large number of holidaying families on the beach below.

"In the long term, the stability of the historic cottages for which this famous beauty spot is noted will be protected for many years to come.

"The support of the two councils and the Environment Agency means the project can become a reality and protect this wonderful jewel in the Yorkshire coastline."

Aerial image of Robin Hood's Bay by North East Coastal Observatory